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What Data Is Google Analytics Goals Unable To Track?

Wondering what data is Google Analytics goals unable to track?

Although Google Analytics is a powerful tool, there are certain limitations to what it can track.

Understanding what data is not available in Google Analytics can help you make better decisions about your website and marketing strategy.

One of the most common limitations of Google Analytics goals is that it cannot track data from third-party sources.

This includes social media platforms, email marketing campaigns, and other external sources.

So, if you’re trying to track conversions from a Facebook ad, for example, you won’t be able to see that data in Google Analytics unless you use UTM parameters or other tracking methods.

Another limitation of Google Analytics goals is that it cannot track data from users who have disabled cookies or use ad blockers.

Since Google Analytics relies on cookies to track user behavior, it cannot collect data from users who have opted out of tracking.

This means that your data may not be entirely accurate, as it only reflects the behavior of users who have not opted out.

What Data Is Google Analytics Goals Unable To Track?

Google Analytics is an incredibly powerful tool that can help you track a wide range of metrics related to your website’s performance.

However, there are some types of data that Google Analytics goals are unable to track.

In this section, we’ll explore some of the most common types of data that are not tracked by Google Analytics goals.

Unable To Track Offline Activities

One of the biggest limitations of Google Analytics goals is that they are unable to track offline activities.

This means that if you have a physical store or business, you won’t be able to track things like in-store purchases or phone calls using Google Analytics goals alone.

However, there are other tools available that can help you track these types of activities, such as call-tracking software or point-of-sale systems.

Inability To Track User Intent

Another limitation of Google Analytics goals is that they are unable to track user intent.

While you can track things like pageviews and clicks, you won’t be able to determine why a user is taking a particular action.

For example, you might be able to see that a user clicked on a particular button, but you won’t know whether they did so because they were interested in learning more about a product or simply because they were curious.

Inability To Track Non-Interactions

Google Analytics goals are also unable to track non-interactions.

This means that if a user spends a certain amount of time on your site or scrolls down a certain amount, you won’t be able to track that activity using Google Analytics goals.

However, there are other tools available that can help you track these types of activities, such as heatmapping software or scroll-tracking tools.

Cannot Track Individual User Behavior

Finally, it’s important to note that Google Analytics goals are unable to track individual user behavior.

While you can track aggregate data related to user behavior, you won’t be able to see how a particular user is interacting with your site.

This can make it difficult to personalize the user experience or identify specific pain points that individual users might be experiencing.

Overall, while Google Analytics goals are incredibly powerful, there are some limitations to what they can track.

By understanding these limitations, you can better tailor your tracking strategy to meet your specific needs.

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Workarounds Tor Google Analytics Limitations

While Google Analytics is a powerful tool for tracking website performance, it has some limitations.

Here are some workarounds for some of the most common limitations:

Using Offline Conversion Tracking

One limitation of Google Analytics is that it can’t track offline conversions, such as phone calls or in-store purchases.

However, you can use offline conversion tracking to track these conversions.

You can do this by using a third-party tool that integrates with Google Analytics, such as CallRail or Marchex.

These tools allow you to track phone calls and other offline conversions and then import that data into Google Analytics.

Leveraging User Surveys

Another limitation of Google Analytics is that it can’t tell you why users are behaving a certain way on your website.

However, you can use user surveys to gather this information.

By surveying your users, you can get insights into why they are leaving your site or why they are not converting.

You can then use this information to make improvements to your site.

Utilizing Event Tracking

Google Analytics can track certain events on your website, such as button clicks or form submissions.

However, there may be other events that you want to track that Google Analytics can’t track out of the box. In these cases, you can use event tracking to track these events.

Event tracking allows you to track any custom event on your website, such as video plays or downloads.

By using these workarounds, you can overcome some of the limitations of Google Analytics and get more insights into your website’s performance.

Key Takeaways

Here are some key takeaways from this article:

  • Google Analytics goals cannot track data from offline sources such as customer service calls or customer feedback forms.
  • Google Analytics goals also cannot track data from sources outside of the Google Analytics tracking code, such as from third-party sources or other analytics tools.
  • Goals can measure how well your site or app fulfills your target objectives, but it’s important to set your goals properly to get the most out of your analytics data.
  • While Google Analytics Goals can be used to track any desired action, such as newsletter sign-ups, purchase confirmations, or downloads, it is unable to track some data such as Customer’s Lifetime Value.
  • Setting your goals is essential to measure the progress of different parameters of single or multiple projects, and the progress can be further analyzed in a better way after stacking the results against the predefined goals or KPIs.

By keeping these key takeaways in mind, you can better understand the limitations of Google Analytics goals and how to use them effectively to measure the success of your business.

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